Professor of American Literature Receives National Recognition

April 28 2016
Category: Academics

Matt Seybold, Assistant Professor of American Literature and Mark Twain Studies at Elmira College, has been selected as an NEH Summer Scholar from a national applicant pool. He will attend one of 23 seminars and institutes supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Endowment is a federal agency that, each summer, supports these enrichment opportunities at colleges, universities, and cultural institutions, so that faculty can work in collaboration and study with experts in humanities disciplines. Each teacher receives a generous stipend from the NEH to cover their travel, study, and living expenses. The approximately 521 NEH Summer Scholars will teach over 91,175 American students the following year.

 

“Economics must not be reduced to stock indexes and interest rates. These are but symptoms and side effects. The economy is not an elaborate equation. It is a cacophonous conversation, comprised of arguments and narratives which motivate people to engage in the marketplace, for good or ill, as entrepreneurs, consumers, and laborers.”

Professor Seybold will participate in an Institute entitled "The History of Political Economy." The three-week program will be held at Duke University and directed by Bruce Caldwell, Director of Duke’s Center for the History of Political Economy. Caldwell will be joined by nine prominent economic historians, each of whom will lead 2-3 sessions on readings from their areas of specialization, including works by Milton Friedman, Friedrich Hayek, David Hume, John Maynard Keynes, Karl Marx, and Adam Smith.

25 NEH Summer Scholars will travel to Duke from all regions of the U.S. They represent fifteen states, eight public universities, eight private universities, eight liberal arts colleges, and one public community college. They hold faculty appointments in Business, Communications, Economics, English, German, History, Information Technology, Japanese, Philosophy, Political Science, and Public Policy.

Dr. Seybold approaches literary and cultural texts as “economic generators.” He writes, “Economics must not be reduced to stock indexes and interest rates. These are but symptoms and side effects. The economy is not an elaborate equation. It is a cacophonous conversation, comprised of arguments and narratives which motivate people to engage in the marketplace, for good or ill, as entrepreneurs, consumers, and laborers.”

In May, Dr. Seybold’s econo-literary scholarship will be part of the Trouble Begins at Eight series sponsored by Elmira College’s Center for Mark Twain Studies. He is also currently teaching a course on The Culture of Global Recession. Recent and forthcoming publications can be found in Mark Twain Annual, Mark Twain Journal, Reception, Henry James Review, T. S. Eliot Studies Annual, and Western Humanities Review.