State of the Art Gallery Exhibit Features Kather

June 27 2016
Category: Faculty

As part of a State of the Art Gallery (Ithaca, NY) exhibition with Stan Bowman and Mary Ann Bowman, Elmira College media artist Jan Kather will present her installation "The Wedding Portfolio: Imitation Paintings," a group of digitally enhanced photographs on canvas, along with an oil painting by collaborator/artist Dan Reidy. Additionally, in cooperation with Khalifa+Sturiale Projects and Renegade Screen, Jan will be showing "This Disappearing World," a combination of images curated by artist Galvin Harrison. Participating artists include Atli Thor Alfredsson (Iceland), Brad S. Wise (USA), Hans Manner-Jakobsen (Denmark), Mehrdad Naraghi (Iran), Myriam Abdelaziz (Egypt) and Jan Kather (USA). The exhibition is on display from June 29 through July 31, with the opening reception on Friday, July 1 from 5-8pm. Always free and open to the public, the gallery, located at 120 W. State/Martin Luther King Street, is open Wed.-Fri. from Noon - 6:00 p.m. and weekends, Noon to 5:00 p.m.

For additional information, visit http://www.soag.org/

Oil painting at left by Dan Reidy in response to the "imitation" painting digitally created by Jan Kather

Artist Statement

JAN KATHER
The Wedding Portfolio: Imitation Paintings
Ink Jet on Canvas
in collaboration with
DAN REIDY
Oil on Canvas

An ironic twist of art history

First there was painting.
Then there was photography that imitated painting.
By 1970 painters imitated photography
By slavishly copying photographs
To create photorealist paintings.

And now, here you have it,
A reversal of the reversal of the reversal:
Photographs imitating painting
With the help of photorealist filters in Photoshop
Reimagined here by Dan Reidy who says:

“Paint is funny because it smushes around
and bends to your will when you're with it.
It's open to all your whims and moods, good and bad.
Then you go away and it becomes fixed.
It’s like the present time becomes the past.”

Maybe this is how to fix art that isn’t broken,
or break art that is forever fixed?